Ceroc and me

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Last night I went to Ceroc.  I have a love-hate relationship with dancing Ceroc.  It isn’t Salsa, it isn’t Rock ‘n Roll, it isn’t Jive.  It is a little bit of all of them – not one thing or another.  They call it a fusion of Jive and Salsa.  What Ceroc has going for it – it is easy to learn and you can dance it to anything.  They claim that you can learn how to dance in one evening.

The average English male is not noted for his dancing skills.  I can verify this first-hand – having learned Salsa and Argentine Tango.

There are a lot of men out there that realise if they want to meet women, they gotta dance.   You can be the ugliest man on the planet, but if you can dance well and are nice to the ladies – you can have any woman on the dance floor – to dance with, that is.

I am impressed with the Ceroc method.  They offer a beginner’s class which is taught pretty much the same in any venue.  They teach the basics of Ceroc.  Even if you never go further than beginner’s – if you have rhythm and musicality – you can still have a lot of fun and dance.  While teaching the next level, the beginners are taken to another room to review what they have just learned.  This usually ends up being a much smaller group – so the lesson is more intense.

When the classes are finished and the free-style starts, there are usually a few taxi dancers available for the next hour that one could ask to dance and practice with.

All of this sounds great so far.  What I think finally sells it for Ceroc is that anyone can ask for a dance – and the general rule is that you are supposed to say yes – after all, it is only one dance.  By saying yes to a dance, the self-esteem and confidence of the dancer increases – allowing them to take more risks in going out there and actually putting into practice what they have learned.

Because the music played in an evening is so varied – anything from pop, rap, disco, Latin, blues and rock ‘n roll – there is usually something for everyone.  I have to admit – I draw the line at dancing to ‘I will survive’ and anything resembling house music.

When I started dancing Argentine Tango, I pretty much turned my back on Salsa – apart from the occasional Salsa break at a Milonga.  Tango is complicated – I could never explain in words how I feel about it and the feelings it evokes in me.  One thing I can say though – there is no spinning around in Tango.  The spinning in Salsa would make me dizzy – there are those that don’t lead well and think that by spinning the lady around a lot makes them look like they can dance – not so.

Unfortunately, the same happens in Ceroc.  I was watching the dance floor last night and there were a few men that hardly moved at all – they were just spinning the ladies around.  I was talking to a lovely woman from North London – she said that sometimes she gets spun around so much – she thought that she would take off and end up in Mars!

Even so – in spite of all the spinning around – there are times I just need to move every bit of my body to the music – not just my lower half.

Even though I am not crazy about all of the music played at a Ceroc venue – I do manage to dance a lot and have fun.

Fun!  That is the key word here.  Almost everyone seems to be having fun.  I have never seen so many men really let themselves go.  I have fun dancing Ceroc!  I can go and dance for one hour at Ceroc and have more fun in that hour than in a month of dancing Tango.  Don’t get me wrong – I do have fun at a Milonga – but it is different, more serious.

I describe my dance life as this – Ceroc and Salsa are from the neck upwards – the rest belongs to Tango – Tango fills my heart and soul.

As the song by Cindy Lauper goes – ‘Girls just want to have fun’ – so when I’m in the mood for some light relief – I’ll go to Ceroc.

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2 responses

  1. Ceroc is FAB! I also do Latin and Ballroom and find the same, ceroc is ‘fun’ and latin and ballroom I take ‘seriously’ and focus on footwork, posture etc.

    I love both just as much as each other though!

    Great post 🙂