You CAN Do-over When Watercolor Fails

Remember this?

Calla Lilies - Watercolor on Paper-A4
Calla Lilies – Watercolor on Paper-A4

This painting is a big fail for me, on many levels.  I hate wasting paper.  Many ‘good’ water color artists say that its only paper if it doesn’t work out, but paper is expensive and I know how its made (I used to work in the paper industry).  Also, I was really only unhappy with a portion of my painting, but it still wasn’t good enough to crop.  So, I washed it!  Yup, I washed off the paint with one of those magic erasers.  I can’t take the credit for this idea – it was an artist called Deb Watson who I found on youtube.  For those of you who don’t know what a magic eraser is, this is what a used one looks like.

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You don’t need to spend a lot of money on these.  I got two in a packet from the pound store.  They sell them at online art stores for more than that.  They are great for getting marks off of walls and other things.  It turns out that it is also great for removing paint from a painting.  Check out Deb Watson on youtube and watch her tutorials on how to wash paint or removing it from a part of your painting.  So, after washing my painting, it looked like this:

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 This is now a ghost painting.  I can get rid of those leaves now.  This is how it turned out.

Calla Lilies-Watercolor on Paper-A4
Calla Lilies-Watercolor on Paper-A4

I took the opportunity to be bolder with my colors and I also used salt.  Maldon salt to be precise. I also took an opportunity to try out my new Winsor & Newton watercolor marker set.  I bought one to use for signing paintings and decided to get a whole set.  I will do a review on these once I have tried them out on different paper, etc.  It isn’t a perfect painting, but I am happier with this one than when I painted the leaves.

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3 thoughts on “You CAN Do-over When Watercolor Fails

  1. I’ve done that quite a few times, too. Isn’t it great, we can do it over and I agree not wasting paper is a great thing. The early watercolorists used whatever paper they could get their hands on.

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